Category: Ethics

Janet Rowland says she’ll “fight for the truth” while having a history of being untruthful herself in the local media

Janet Rowland’s March 28 Instagram post touting her devotion to “the truth.”

County Commissioner Janet Rowland (R), in a campaign plug she posted March 28 on her VoteJanetRowland Instagram page, says she “will always fight for the truth, even when the media presents the facts in a way that distorts the truth.”

But even as Janet denigrates the local media as untruthful, we must remember an episode in 2007 when Janet deceived the public herself by using local media.

Making it worse is the fact that even after it was exposed, she’s never taken responsibility for it, or apologized for it.

Shortly after losing statewide election for lieutenant governor as Bob Beauprez’s running mate in 2006, while she was previously Mesa County Commissioner, Janet was a columnist for the Grand Junction Free Press, at the time a competing newspaper to the Daily Sentinel. She wrote several columns for the Free Press under her own name until one day a sharp reader spotted the fact that Janet had been lifting the text of her columns word for word from government pamphlets, and brought this to the attention of the Free Press’s editor.

Making excuses

Janet’s first reaction to being charged with plagiarism was to claim she couldn’t even remember writing the columns. When that failed to tamp down the controversy, she said the information in her columns had been intended for “mass duplication anyhow,” adding that if people wanted to make out what she did as something evil, that was THEIR prerogative. Next, she tried to blame the plagiarism on others, saying she had included the necessary attributions in her column, but Free Press staff had edited them out. Free Press management quickly produced the emails Janet had sent  to the paper for publication, exactly as she had sent them, showing that they contained zero references or attributions.

The Feb. 3, 2007 issue of the Daily Sentinel about Janet Rowland plagiarizing columns in the Free Press

Needless to say, the Free Press subsequently fired Janet as a columnist.

Why the big deal about a little plagiarism?

Plagiarism isn’t just dishonest and untruthful, it’s morally reprehensible for several reasons.

First of all, you make a deliberate decision to lie to the public when you claim a work is your own when it’s not. Second, it is stealing the work of others, which is theft. A person who commits plagiarism commits fraud by taking credit for the accomplishments of others. Plagiarizing combines all of these moral wrongs — lying, theft and fraud — into a single act. It is academic dishonesty, the equivalent of cheating on tests and fabricating data for a study. In academic circles, plagiarism destroys the reputations and careers of those who engage in it, and it speaks poorly of the institution you graduated from, in Janet’s case, Northwest University in Kirkland, Washington — a Christian university where she obtained a degree in Bible literature.

It doesn’t matter where the information was stolen from, whether from an individual or a government source. If the writing is not your own words and ideas, you need to attribute the work to the original, authentic source.

Janet never took responsibility for the plagiarism.

Janet never apologized to the readers of the Free Press for her plagiarism after it was publicly exposed. Instead, she tried to deflect her wrongdoing by making lame excuses and leaving it to the managing editor of the Free Press to apologize to readers for the deception.

From the February 6, 2007 issue of the Grand Junction Daily Sentinel

There’s nothing honorable, ethical or truthful about what Janet did or how she handled it, and the fact that she used a local media outlet to perpetrate it — media SHE now denigrates as “distorting the truth” — makes it even worse, and far more hypocritical.

To voters’ benefit, though, the episode gives insight into Janet’s character that voters need to evaluate her fitness for elected office.

It demonstrates that:

1) Janet will try to get away with unethical acts when it serves her purpose and she thinks she can get away with it;

2) She will pass off the work of others as her own if she beleives she is unlikely to get caught, and,

3) She will deflect responsibility for unethical or immoral acts by making excuses and blaming others rather than taking responsibility and apologizing as a person of integrity would, although a person of real integrity would be unlikely to commit such unethical acts to begin with. If a truly ethical person thought any action they were about to undertake might remotely be considered unethical, they would likely consult others before doing it.

This is important information voters need to decide who is best suited to be county commissioner. Do you want a commissioner who tries to get away with things, skirt the letter and intent of rules and agreements and who will do end runs around the law, or someone who will serve honestly and ethically, strive to be moral and abide by all laws and rules to the best of their ability?

Colorado Republican legislators who oppose all gun safety legislation make the strongest case for why it is needed


Colorado Republican Rep. Don Wilson of Monument accidentally left a loaded Glock 9mm handgun in a restroom at the state Capitol last week.

In an apology on Twitter/X, Wilson claimed he “takes firearm safety very seriously,” which his behavior contradicts.

Wilson is the latest in a string of Colorado Republicans who have mishandled guns in and around the Capitol.

In seismic shift for the local GOP, Tim Foster endorses Janet Rowland’s opponent, J.J. Fletcher, for county commissioner

Endorsement posted on the “JJ Fletcher for Mesa County Commissioner” campaign website

In what amounts to a subtle but seismic shift in local politics, former Colorado Mesa University (CMU) President Tim Foster publicly endorsed Janet Rowland’s opponent, J.J. Fletcher, for Mesa County commissioner, formally ending his years-long support for Rowland.

Mesa County Commissioners ignoring safety concerns & quietly working to tweak land use code to advantage large scale solar development, citizens say

Commercial solar development on east Orchard Mesa (Photo: High Noon Solar)

On January 9, Mesa County Commissioners Janet Rowland, Cody Davis and Bobbie Daniel voted to put a moratorium on large-scale solar development in the County supposedly to take time to address the community’s growing concerns over these developments. Citizens are worried that the current county Land Development Code (LDC) contains no provisions protecting agricultural and irrigated land, wildlife, water sheds and view sheds from these developments, as well as no requirements for fire protection, buffers, setbacks or plans to decommission these installations that will assure solar plants that get destroyed by inclement weather or live out their expected life spans are cleaned up in a way that minimizes  environmental harm and expense to local taxpayers.

Restore the Balance is bringing Cassidy Hutchinson to Grand Junction

The promotional poster for Cassidy Hutchinson’s appearance in Grand Junction. RTB will have more details on this event as the time draws closer.

Cassidy Hutchinson is a former White House aide who served as assistant to Chief of Staff Mark Meadows during the Trump administration.

Hutchinson testified at the June 28, 2022 public hearings of the United States House Select Committee on the January 6 Attack, providing testimony on President Donald Trump’s conduct and that of his senior aides and political allies before and during the January 6 United States Capitol attack. As a Trump administration member and direct eye witness to the events that unfolded that day, Hutchinson’s testimony received significant national attention, with several media outlets calling it “compelling” and “explosive.”

Lauren Boebert’s eldest son arrested on 22 charges amid alleged crime spree

Rifle Police Department’s Facebook post about the Tyler Boebert’s arrest yesterday.

House Rep. Lauren Boebert’s eldest son, Tyler Jay Boebert, 18, was arrested yesterday, February 27, 2024 (pdf) by the Rifle Police Department on a mix of 22 charges of felonies and petty offenses. The arrest came amid a spree of car break-ins and property thefts in Rifle.

Local owner of Red Rock Auto pushed out

Bryan Knight, the now former part-owner of Red Rock Auto dealerships

The sole local owner of the Red Rock Auto dealership chain, Bryan Knight, has been pushed out of the company.

Documents from the Colorado Department of Revenue show Mr. Knight, who oversaw the Red Rock dealerships and had long been listed as a partner and minority owner of the Red Rock GMC and Honda stores, is no longer an owner of record for any Red Rock stores.

The rumor that Mr. Knight had been pushed out of Red Rock Auto came on January 19, when someone in the local auto industry contacted AnneLandmanBlog to say “Bryan Knight no longer works at Red Rock.”

Rumor: In a reversal, Red Rock got fleeced by a customer

Buyer Beware: Mesa County does not license homebuilders, and state law makes it hard to hold builders accountable

BAD DECISIONS – Mesa County Commissioners approved construction of this Redlands home years ago in which setbacks were inadequate to save the house from sliding down the bluff towards the Colorado River. Mesa County does not license home builders and county building codes and inspections were inadequate to prevent this situation.

If you are planning to build or buy a newly-built home in Mesa County, be forewarned that Mesa County has no licensing requirements for homebuilders and Colorado laws make it hard to hold home builders accountable when things go wrong, and lots can go wrong.

Soils report at heart of lawsuit against Cody Davis & Chronos Builders recommended alternative foundations, but plaintiffs say Davis never disclosed the report to them as Colorado law requires

Swelling clay soils can triple their volume when they get wet, causing them to exert tremendous force on a home’s foundation, and hence damage, if no measures are taken to mitigate the potential damage. Clay soils are very common across Mesa County. [Click photo to enlarge for better view.] (Photo: Colorado Geological Survey)

The geotechnical soils investigation (pdf) done on a building lot on Horseshoe Drive in Fruita where Mesa County Commissioner Cody Davis and his construction company, Chronos Builders, built a spec home in 2015-2016 stated clearly that expansive clay soils were present on the site and that “Based upon our experience with the Mancos shale in the vicinity of the site, the shale is anticipated to be slightly to moderately expansive.”

Michael A. Berry, the professional engineer who authored the report, recommended three types of foundations that would better protect the structure from “heave related movements” than a typical shallow foundation, but also admitted such foundations are “usually cost prohibitive.”

Former Mesa County Commissioner Rose Pugliese elected state House Minority Leader

Rose Pugliese supported disastrous former Mesa County Clerk Tina Peters in the 2018 election despite the fact that Tina was completely unqualified to be a County Clerk. Tina was running  against Bobbie Gross, who was already certified to run state and local elections, was managing the DMV and had more than a decade of experience in the Clerk’s office.

Former two-term Mesa County Commissioner Rose Pugliese, who moved to Colorado Springs in 2020 to run for the state House District 14 seat (and won the seat), has been elected Republican House Minority Leader in the Colorado Legislature. She replaces Rep. Mike Lynch (R), who resigned as Minority Leader on Wednesday, 1/24/24 after it was revealed that he had been arrested in September, 2022 on suspicion of driving under the influence (DUI) and possessing a firearm while intoxicated. Lynch pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 18 months probation and 150 hours of community service.

FTC finalizes CARS Rule to combat Red Rock-style auto sales scams that have plagued customers

Last minute update: The FTC’s CARS Rule, which is the subject of this article and was intended to put a stop to shady dealerships’ worst abuses of customers, was scheduled to go into effect July 30, 2024, but was officially postponed (pdf) on January 18, 2024 as a result of lobbying by the Texas Automobile Dealers Association and the National Automobile Dealers Association, which oppose the rule.

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On December 12, 2023, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) finalized the Combating Auto Retail Scams rule (CARS) to end the most common abuses that dealerships like Red Rock Auto in Grand Junction have long perpetrated on customers when selling cars. The CARS Rule was scheduled to go into effect on July 30, 2024. [See above last minute update].

Mesa County Board of Public Health Chair Stephen D. Daniels owes the state over $10,000 in unpaid taxes

A court issued a distraint warrant against the property of Stephen D. Daniels in Eagle County on 12/28/10 for unpaid property taxes in the amount of $10,200.19. As of January 3, 2024, the judgment is still listed as “UNSATISFIED”

Update: As of February 1, 2024, the debt is still listed as “Unsatisfied,” and appears to date back to the filing period of 12/21/2003.

Stephen D. Daniels, Chair of Mesa County’s new and supposedly more financially responsible Board of Public Health, has owed the State of Colorado $10,200 in unpaid income taxes since at least 2010. Court records accessed on 1/3/2024 currently list the debt as “UNSATISFIED.”

In 2010, the Colorado Department of Revenue (DOR) filed a lawsuit against Daniels for $10,200.19 in unpaid taxes (Case No. 2010CV800822). On December 28, 2010, an Eagle County Court entered a judgment against Daniels for the amount and then issued a distraint warrant against Daniels’ property. After the judgment and warrant were filed with the Eagle County Clerk and Recorder, the warrant became a lien on all of the real estate Daniels owns in Eagle County.

Daniels apparently has ignored the judgment, debt and warrant for over 13 years.

Mesa County Commissioner Cody Davis uses offensive term in public hearing about the county budget


To be fair, Mesa County Commissioner Cody Davis (R) probably had no idea what he was saying when he said it, but it was highly offensive.

23 minutes or so into the Commissioners’ meeting on December 12, 2023 to approve the annual budget (video), Commissioner Davis discusses how difficult it is for him to understand the budgeting process and said,

“Mongoloid” is an offensive term used to refer to people with Down Syndrome

“If I didn’t have help sometimes, reading this budget I’d feel like a knuckle-dragging Mongoloid.”

He was apparently unaware that “knuckle-dragging Mongoloid” is a highly offensive term.

The term “Mongoloid” for a long time was a pejorative term used to refer to people affected by Down Syndrome. It is also a racist term used to refer to people of Asian descent.

District 51 quietly working on plan that involves firing over 50 teachers in Fruita

Fruita 8/9 School, August 2022 (Photo: Facebook)

AnneLandmanBlog received the following communication this morning titled “A Huge Concern,” from a D-51 teacher who wants to get word out about the School District quietly moving forward with a plan to fire over 50 Fruita-area teachers, many of whom have over 20 years of experience:

What’s wrong with “Medicare Advantage” plans?

Frame from a TV ad by a local agency that sells Medicare Advantage plans

At this time of year, ads hawking “Medicare Advantage” plans flood every possible media outlet, imploring seniors to call 1-800 numbers and contact their local insurance brokers for “free Medicare evaluations” where brokers can sign them up for Medicare Advantage (MA) plans, also called Part C plans, that offer premiums a bit lower than traditional Medicare and freebies like vision screenings, dental cleanings, gym memberships and a monthly allowance to spend on drugstore merchandise.

These plans definitely sound alluring, but don’t be fooled.

Board of Public Health & county commissioners violated state public health law with their new intergovernmental agreement

Stephen D. Daniels, new Chair of the Mesa County Board of Public Health,  violated Colorado Title 25 by giving control over the health department’s budget to the elected county commissioners. No provision in the state public health law permits that.

When the Mesa County Commissioners had the Board of Health (BOH) sign their new Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA), the commissioners, County Attorney Todd Starr and all 7 members of the new BOH all either knowingly or unknowingly violated Colorado Revised Statute Title 25, Article 1, Part 5(k).

Tina Peters sues to overturn her $15,400 campaign finance violation fine

Tina Peters in a November 2, 2023 video posted on YouTube

Tina Peters filed a lawsuit (pdf) November 8 against Colorado Secretary of State Jena Griswold to overturn the $15,400 campaign finance violation fine an administrative law judge levied against her on October 4, 2023, claiming the fine is “unfair” and that it has “irreparably injured” her.

The Court fined her for soliciting donations to run for re-election as Mesa County Clerk in 2021-2022 without having first filed the necessary paperwork with the state that requires she report the money she raised and spent on her campaign. The fine pertained to Tina’s campaign for County Clerk that she dropped out of in 2022 to run for Colorado Secretary of State instead. Tina lost the primary election for that seat to her Republican competitor by 14 percentage points, but she is telling people in interviews that she won that election.